Why Do I Work?

Written by Carl Greene

September 15, 2021

We work a lot of hours–whether it is in our home, raising our family, earning a paycheck, or volunteering, we invest a lot of time. Do you have an overall purpose in mind for the work that you do, or do the following statements dominate your thoughts when it comes to your work? 

I would like to work if my job was not so awful.

My work outside the church is for financial income or to keep my household functioning well, but it has little significance in God’s purpose and plan for me on earth.

My work sucks the life out of me and offers no joy as I grind out the week.

I become so engaged with my tasks at work that God can feel distant during my day.

The only value to my place of work is as an opportunity for public witness of my faith.

If any of these statements connect with you, it might be helpful to join a discussion about the Theology of Work. A springboard to this discussion is the book Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God’s Work by Timothy Keller, which sets out to answer three questions: “Why do we need to work in order to lead a fulfilled life? Why is [work] so often fruitless, pointless, and difficult? How can we overcome the difficulties and find satisfaction in our work through the gospel?”   

In cooperation with the Mustard Seed Foundation, SDB General Conference Executive Director will host a Zoom group discussion that focuses on an SDB informed Theology of Work. Over the course of 4 sessions, we will discuss each of these questions. We will read Keller’s book individually and then come together as a group to talk about our take-aways, push backs, and thoughts in response. In the end, each of us will develop a Theology of Work statement that answers “Why do I work?” based on Scripture. Maybe even find some joy on the journey. If you are interested in participating, please contact Carl at cgreene@seventhdaybaptist.org. 

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